luckypeach
luckypeach:

Today we’re #TBTing to our All You Can Eat issue with exceptional incidences of historical gluttony.
How many lampreys is too many lampreys? Looks like King Henry I of England (1068-1135) discovered the answer. The sixty-seven year old king supposedly died from eating too many of the eel-like sea creatures, which were usually consumed in pie form back in his day. According to Quigley’s Cabinet, his death occurred in Normandy, and before his body was sent back to England, the French took out his eyes, brain, tongue, and internal organs and kept them in the Rouen Cathedral.
Gif by Richie Brown

luckypeach:

Today we’re #TBTing to our All You Can Eat issue with exceptional incidences of historical gluttony.

How many lampreys is too many lampreys? Looks like King Henry I of England (1068-1135) discovered the answer. The sixty-seven year old king supposedly died from eating too many of the eel-like sea creatures, which were usually consumed in pie form back in his day. According to Quigley’s Cabinet, his death occurred in Normandy, and before his body was sent back to England, the French took out his eyes, brain, tongue, and internal organs and kept them in the Rouen Cathedral.

Gif by Richie Brown

luckypeach
luckypeach:

Today we’re #TBTing to our All You Can Eat issue with exceptional incidences of historical gluttony.
During the Cold War, the American-Soviet rivalry didn’t just manifest itself in spies and Space Races and psychological warfare; athletic competitions, especially weightlifting and body building, took on a political sheen, too. Which makes it all the more significant that in 1958, in the midst of it all, an American weightlifter faced off against a Soviet weightlifter for an eating competition in New York. In front of a crowd of 250 people, they each took down eight lobsters and six squab before they both surrendered, leaving 12 lamb chops and 10 steaks behind.
Gif by Richie Brown

luckypeach:

Today we’re #TBTing to our All You Can Eat issue with exceptional incidences of historical gluttony.

During the Cold War, the American-Soviet rivalry didn’t just manifest itself in spies and Space Races and psychological warfare; athletic competitions, especially weightlifting and body building, took on a political sheen, too. Which makes it all the more significant that in 1958, in the midst of it all, an American weightlifter faced off against a Soviet weightlifter for an eating competition in New York. In front of a crowd of 250 people, they each took down eight lobsters and six squab before they both surrendered, leaving 12 lamb chops and 10 steaks behind.

Gif by Richie Brown

luckypeach

luckypeach:

Ah Labor Day, that final melancholic belch the summer emits as it pushes back from the table and makes way for autumn. In these foreboding days of unforeseeable weather, the official end of summer never seems to sync up with the end of long, hot days, or, for that matter, our desire to linger outside getting tipsy. Thus we present you with an activity for just such purposes: Goon of Fortune. Editor in Chief Chris Ying learned this game from esteemed food writer Myffy Rigby, she of Time Out Australia, where the summer is yet to come and the bladders that store the goods inside of boxes of wine are called “goon sacks.” This game requires a kind of laundry line not common in America, but resourceful online shoppers or improvisors will be richly rewarded.  

Gifs by Richie Brown